The Christian Science Monitor
By Dorothy Adlow
New York

...Umaña is the name of the artist whose drawings are shown at the Delacorte Gallery, Born in Bogota, Colombia,
Umaña has settled in New York. He is experimental, he is versatile, working in silverpoint and goldpoint, in pencil,
pen, and crayon. There are town views like “Saint Tropez,” still lifes and figure drawings. The compass is wide and it is obvious that the artist has been inspired by Picasso and his associates in the abstract adventure.
...It is pleasant to come upon such indications of skill in draftsmanship, as personal as it may prove to be with Seliger, as Parisian as it turns out with Umaña Disciplines in draftsmanship must be encouraged and preserved.

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Herald Tribune

...The artist Umaña, from Colombia, by way of Paris and New York, is exhibiting still life and figure drawings in different exacting media, such as pen and ink, silverpoint and ink wash at the Delacort Gallery. None of his exhibits lacks skill, precision or delicacy, and in his more complex designs he shows a clear sympathy with the traditional aspects of modern painting. Two artists with whom he appears most agreeable in company are in fact Picasso and Modigliani

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The New York Times

...Returning to the nearly forgotten silver-point medium, the Colombian-born painter Umaña offers a group of
drawings at the Delacorte Gallery, 822 Madison Avenue. The silver-point technique, a favorite with early
Renaissance masters, requires a patient preparation of paper so that the slightest touch of the metal point registers in a silvery, infinitely delicate line. Umaña's drawings show his inherent affinity for the requisite reticence and subtlety. He displays several simplified still-lifes, delineated in a firm structure which recalls Juan Gris; a few contour nude studies, and several works in the Cubist idiom. In addition there are pastels, and two excellent landscape studies in pencil.

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..."His drawings show his inherent affinity for the silver-point medium, simplified still-lifes delineated in a firm structure, contour nude studies, and works in the Cubist idiom. In addition there are pastels and two excellent landscape studies in pencil."
New York Times


...“One sees what once was flower or a landscape transformed entirely into an abstraction of poetic thought realized visually and concisely. No more the flower, but the idea of flower; no more the landscape, but the essence of landscape.”
Joseph Luke Agneta


...“His sculptures whether in marble or wrought iron are always alive, always in movement. Umaña is very much like the artist of antiquity or the Renaissance - he is eclectic; he can do anything that our present time demands of him.”
David Sortor

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